Posts Tagged toys

Recall Of Eco-Novelty Recalls Jumbo Size and Jumbo Multipurpose Cosmo Beads Toys Due To Serious Ingestion Hazard

11 September 2013

recall beads

The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has initiated a recall resulting from determinations that the product involved present a serious ingestion hazard to children.

The recall relates to about 3,500 Eco-Novelty Recalls Jumbo Size and Jumbo Multipurpose Cosmo Beads Toys. These hard and colorful water-absorbing polymer beads can be easily mistaken for candy by a child. When the bead is ingested, it expands and can cause intestinal obstructions inside a child’s body, resulting in severe discomfort, vomiting, dehydration and could be life threatening. The toys need surgery to be removed from the body. Similar toys have not shown up on x-rays.

Cosmo Beads Jumbo Size Colorful Water Balls and Jumbo Multipurpose Colorful Water Balls toys are water absorbing beads that when placed in water will hydrate up to the size of a racquetball. On the front of the toy packages it states Cosmo Beads ™ Colorful Water Balls, Just Add Water, Biodegradable, Non-toxic and Colorfast.  The packages have yellow and black color on the upper left corner and red in the lower right corner. The beads can be seen through an oval, cellophane window near the bottom of the package.

The government has at least one report of an 8-month-old girl who ingested a similar water-absorbing polymer ball that had to be surgically removed.

The toys were sold by Amazon.com, ifleemarket.com and crystalsoilusa.com from June 2011 through August 2013 for between $2 and $20, and were imported by Eco-Novelty Corp., of Troy, Michigan.

Parents and caregivers should always keep in mind how a product will appear to a child in a school or household setting. Many toys are bright and colorful, and even intentionally designed to resemble food or candy, inviting ingestion and choking injuries. If a toy, or one of its components, is small enough to be mouthed or swallowed, it should not be purchased for use in an environment with small children. Manufacturers and retailers of such toys must also pay more attention to safety issues associated with the marketing and sale of these items.

Sadly, many serious injuries and deaths have occurred over the years due to ingestion of small parts by oral-age children. Please be vigilant regarding not only the design of toys, but also the packaging and inserts with small parts warnings and instructions.

Toys and children’s products may be hazardous because of a defective design, or due to poor manufacturing, misleadingly advertised, inaccurate labels, or inadequate cautions or warnings. If you have questions about these issues, feel free to contact Swartz and Swartz PC at (617) 742-1900 or Toll Free at (800) 545-3732.

Build-A-Bear Recalls Stuffed Animal Toy Due to Choking Hazard

30 August 2013

 

Sulley_LARGE

A recall has been issued for more than 25,000 Sulley character stuffed animal sold at Build-A-Bear Workshop stores and online. The stuffed animal’s eye can detach, posing a choking hazard to young children.

Sulley is a furry blue creature from the Monsters movies. The Build-A-Bear stuffed monster is covered in blue furry fabric with purple spots, horn on its head and has blue eyes measuring about 1 inch in diameter. The stuffed monster is about 17 inches high and 10.5 inches wide.

Sadly, choking hazards in children’s toys and other juvenile products account for numerous deaths and injuries each year. A toy that is dangerous because it is hazardously designed may be even more so when badly made, misleadingly advertised, inaccurately labeled, or foolishly and irresponsibly sold to or for children who are too young to appreciate the toy’s hazards or defend against them.

If you or a member of your family has questions about a dangerous toy, please contact us. We will be happy to answer any questions you might have.

Toysmith Recalls Toy Light-Up Frogs and Ducks Due to Choking Hazard

8 August 2013

ToySmithLARGE

This recall includes about 30,000 light-up soft plastic toy frogs and ducks. The toys light up when the sensors on the bottom of the product are touched or placed in water.  The frog comes in green and the ducks come in yellow, pink and clear.  The toys are approximately 2.25 inches in length and 1.5 inches in height.  There is a round tag attached to the product with the UPC number 2424 5159.

The government recall comes after a determination that the metal conductor pin on the bottom of the toys can come out, posing a choking hazard. Sadly, choking hazards in children’s toys and other juvenile products account for numerous deaths and injuries each year. A toy that is dangerous because it is hazardously designed may be even more so when badly made, misleadingly advertised, inaccurately labeled, or foolishly and irresponsibly sold to or for children who are too young to appreciate the toy’s hazards or defend against them.

If you or a member of your family has questions about a dangerous toy, please contact us. We will be happy to answer any questions you might have.

Be Amazing! Toys Recalls Monster Science and Super Star Science Colossal Water Balls Due to Serious Ingestion Hazard

1 August 2013

Be Amazing Toys

These soft and colorful water-absorbing polymer balls can be easily mistaken by a child for candy. When the marble-sized toy is ingested, it can expand inside a child’s body and cause intestinal obstructions, resulting in severe discomfort, vomiting, dehydration and could be life threatening. The toys do not show up on an x-ray and require surgery to be removed from the body.

This recall involves more than 15,000 marble-sized toys that absorb water and grow up to 400 times their original size. They were sold as Monster Science Colossal Water Balls (model #7255) and Super Star Science! Colossal Water Balls (model #7704). The government is aware of at least one incident with a similar water-absorbing polymer ball product in which an 8-month-old girl ingested the ball and it had to be surgically removed.

Parents and caregivers should always keep in mind how a product will appear to a child in a school or household setting. Many toys are bright and colorful, and even intentionally designed to resemble food or candy, inviting ingestion and choking injuries. If a toy, or one of its components, is small enough to be mouthed or swallowed, it should not be purchased for use in an environment with small children. Manufacturers and retailers of such toys must also pay more attention to safety issues associated with the marketing and sale of these items.

Sadly, many serious injuries and deaths have occurred over the years due to ingestion of small parts by oral-age children. Please be vigilant regarding not only the design of toys, but also the packaging and inserts with small parts warnings and instructions.

Toys and children’s products may be hazardous because of a defective design, or due to poor manufacturing, misleadingly advertised, inaccurate labels, or inadequate cautions or warnings. If you have questions about these issues, feel free to contact a personal injury lawyer at Swartz and Swartz PC at (617) 742-1900 or Toll Free at (800) 545-3732.

More than 4.8M Units of Potentially Dangerous Imported Products Discovered During Fiscal Year 2012 Government Screenings

29 July 2013

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) ended fiscal year 2012 having stopped a total of about 4.8 million units of products that violated U.S. safety rules or were found to be hazardous during the fiscal year (October 2011 to September 2012). More than 18,000 different imported consumer products were screened, and about 1,500 of those products were found to be violations and were stopped from moving into the U.S. stream of commerce.

As in the previous fiscal quarters, children’s products with lead levels exceeding federal limits continued to make up the bulk of products stopped in the fourth quarter of 2012.  Toys and other articles with small parts that present a choking hazard for children younger than 3 years old and toys and child care articles with phthalate levels in excess of federal limits were also product categories with a high number of seizures.

Screening efforts intensified in 2008 with the creation of a government import surveillance division, and again in 2011 with the creation of the Office of Import Surveillance.

The Import Stoppage Report and the table of Violative Products Seized at the Port during 4th Quarter, FY 2012 are available at http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Newsroom/News-Releases/2013/More-than-48M-Units-of-Violative-Imported-Products-Kept-at-Bay-During-Fiscal-Year-2012/.

Toys and children’s products may be hazardous because of a defective design, or due to poor manufacturing, misleadingly advertised, inaccurate labels, or inadequate cautions or warnings. If you or a loved one has experienced personal injury as the result of using a defective product, speak with a personal injury lawyer at Swartz and Swartz PC to learn about the legal options available to you. Contact our Boston Law office – we are here to answer your questions and protect your legal rights. Call us at (617) 742-1900 or Toll Free at (800) 545-3732.

Pottery Barn Dolls Recalled

22 September 2011

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has announced that Pottery Barn Kids, a division of William-Sanoma Inc. of San Fransisco, CA, has issued a recallof certain of its dolls. The doll recall is based on a strangulation hazard presented by the hair on the Chloe, Sophie and Audrey dolls, which contains loops that are large enough to fit around the head and neck of a child. The headband on the Audrey doll also poses a strangulation hazard because if loosened from the doll’s body, it can form yet another loop that can potentially strangle a child.

About 81,000 dolls in the United States and 1,300 in Canada were recalled. There were five reported instances of dolls with looped hair, including one report in which a loop of the Chloe doll’s hair was found around the neck of a toddler.

If you or a member of your family has suffered serious injuries due to a defective toy or children’s product, please contact us. We are here to answer your questions and discuss how to protect your legal rights. You can set up an initial consultation with one of the product liability attorneys at our Boston office by calling (617) 742-1900, or toll-free at 1-800-545-3732.

 

By James A. Swartz of Swartz & Swartz, P.C.Permalink