American Museum Of Tort Law Reopens, Including Exhibit Paying Tribute To The Pioneering Work Of Edward M. Swartz

Famed consumer protection advocate Ralph Nader first conceived of a museum honoring tort law in the late 1990s. Last fall, after a fundraising effort, the museum opened its doors in Nader’s hometown of Winsted, Connecticut.

The American Museum of Tort Law hosted private tours during this past winter, and is now reopening to the public with its Great Spring Reawakening. The hall is designed as a tangible educational institution, with a goal of reminding the public of the importance of the jury system and the need to play an active role in it. The exhibits have been well received by thousands of visitors to date.

One popular exhibit pays tribute to the work of the late Boston lawyer Edward M. Swartz, the founder of Swartz & Swartz, P.C. Swartz was a pioneer in the field of product liability law, and is well known for his advocacy on behalf of children and toy safety. His efforts include the writing of many books for the legal practitioner and consumers, the annual “10 Worst Toys” list, and formation of the non-profit group World Against Toys Causing Harm, Inc. (WATCH).

The museum seeks to increase citizen understanding of Tort Law – the law of wrongful injury – and the role it plays in protecting personal freedom, health and safety through the American civil justice system.

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